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A Short Guide to Cypriot Wines
05/03/2019
The island of Cyprus has a rich vinicultural history—the world’s oldest named wine, Commandaria, is produced only here. The island’s mineral-rich soils and diverse micro-climates are conducive to growing a wide range of grape varieties. A list of wines currently produced in Cyprus reveals some familiar ones, such as chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, cabernet sauvignon, merlot, and shiraz, that yield very worthy wines. Yet there will be some varieties on the list that are unfamiliar to many—indigenous grapes you can’t find anywhere else. The best-known white variety, for example, is xynisteri. It produces dry or medium dry wines with flavours of green grass, herbs, citrus, and minerals; a xynisteri is a good companion for fried calamari and a village salad. Lesser grown white varieties include the lively and herbaceous spourtiko, aromatic and well-balanced promara, and crisp, light morokanela. Of the reds, the most popular indigenous variety is maratheftiko. It yields a full-bodied, deep red wine with berry flavours that perfectly complements lamb kleftiko and pasta dishes. Another notable local red, yiannoudi, is medium-bodied and gives spicy notes of anise, vanilla, and pepper; sip it with grilled meats or pizza with sausage topping. The most-grown red grape variety, mavro, is featured (with xynisteri) in Commandaria; try the dessert wine with dried fruits and blue cheeses. Cyprus wineries also produce some very good rosés through blends. Almyra’s restaurants offer a good sampling of local wines. Identify your favourite and then head to the source: the seven Cyprus Wine Routes take you to forty-one local producers.

 
 
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